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Sins of the Forgotten - 2nd Entry

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This note is obtained as a reward for the Conquering the Shattered Realm quest and completing the 25th level of The Shattered Realm.

All that we see, the animals that we breed for meat, the trees we harvest of their fruit, all were a gift of a nameless god. All this was bestowed upon us and but one thing was asked in return: worship.

The radiant entity stood before the first of our people, its light brighter than a star in the sky, and demanded fealty. Its arrival was heralded by a breathtaking meteor shower. All were in awe of their benefactor. All kneeled.

Monuments were erected in its honor. The finest artists argued over which materials were most worthy of capturing a divine's countenance. Temples were constructed by the sweat and blood of our people. A grand ziggurat was built at the heart of Ralyoth to stand as the celestial's throne and fanatic worshippers sacrificed themselves upon the temple steps to gain the god's favor.

But as our society flourished and our people spread out across the vast lands created for them, they became discontent. The blessings of the divine were no longer witnessed by all. The boons of the harvest were not felt on the outer reaches of our empire. Disease became more common as our cities grew crowded.

The people's ire was placed upon their divine. They felt that their worship warranted greater blessings, that the sacrifices their ancestors made earned them the right to a blissful existence. For a time, it seems the god was willing to appease its people, but as it granted boons to one group, another grew angry that their prayers were not answered first. Unrest became commonplace. Citizens turned to crime where once the land provided all they desired. And as they turned their backs upon the very god that gave them everything, the divine grew silent and reclusive.

What I find peculiar in these retellings is that not once was the god's name uttered, and a few places I could find that referred to it directly had been blotted out with black ink. Our ancestors, it appears, were thorough in erasing evidence of its existence.

See also: